Sciences

Science Department

Our goal is to offer diversified science courses that are relevant and provide students the knowledge and experience to pursue further studies in the sciences or simply participate in a modern society dominated by science and technology. Our emphasis is on an understanding of modern scientific methodologies, including current methods of scientific experimentation, as well as up-to-date laboratory techniques and equipment. A particular effort is made to offer transferable courses for the various vocational programs at SCC and to science programs of the regional academic institutions throughout the Northwest.

The Science Department at SCC seeks to encourage an attitude of discovery and critical analysis along with a genuine interest in the sciences. We strive to offer a wide variety of introductory and second-year college science courses that not only challenge students' traditional views of science, but build the scientific skills that create a sound foundation which students will use when viewing the world around them.

Requirements for Science Majors - a PDF document

Building 27, Livingston Science and Mathematics, is the state-of-the-art home for the Science Department. Please come and visit our beautiful facility.

photo
faculty offices and basalt columns
photo
main entrance
photo
entry way - stairway
photo
looking down from the third floor at
public art tile flooring

 

For more information.... For more information:
Contact: Jaye Hopkins,
Department Chair
Email: Jaye.Hopkins@scc.spokane.edu
Phone: (509) 533-8289 or
1-800-248-5644 ext 8289
Spokane Community College

Take the Right Science Class to Meet Your Needs

Take BIOL& 160 IF you you are in a program that requires any of the following classes:

  • BIOL& 241: Human A&P 1
  • BIOL& 242: Human A&P 2
  • BIOL 233: Genetics
  • BOT 111: Botany: Plant Structure and Function
  • BOT 112: Botany: Survey of the Plant Kingdom
  • BIOL& 260: Microbiology
  • ZOOL 121: Invertebrate Zoology
  • ZOOL 122: Vertebrate Zoology

BIOL& 160 is a time-intensive, rigorous course intended mostly for students in the health sciences or sciences.

If you simply need a five-credit lab science course to fulfill the A.A. degree requirements, you can choose from the following:

These courses are more student-friendly and contain curriculum that is more relevant to students' everyday lives.


SCC offers a variety of day and evening biology courses designed to satisfy A.A. and A.A.S. degree requirements. Most offerings are transferable to area four-year colleges; however, specific questions on transferability should be directed to counselors.

All course offerings are subject to change. The college cannot guarantee class offerings, designated times or specific instructors - as funding levels and student interest may affect whether or not an offering is available.

Click on the course title to view course description.

Course Title Credits
BIOL 100Environmental Biology 5.0
BIOL 105General Biology w/Lab 5.0
BIOL 115Biology for Elementary Education 5.0
BIOL 120Scientific Investigation 5.0
BIOL& 160General Biology w/Lab 5.0
BIOL 204Human A & P 1 5.0
BIOL 205Human A & P 2 5.0
BIOL& 221Majors Ecology/Evolution: w/Lab 5.0
BIOL& 222Majors Cell/Molecular: w/Lab 5.0
BIOL& 223Majors Organismal Phys: w/Lab 5.0
BIOL& 241Human A & P 1 5.0
BIOL& 242Human A & P 2 5.0
BIOL 244Genetics 5.0
BIOL& 260Microbiology 5.0
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.

SCC offers a variety of day and evening chemistry courses designed to satisfy A.A. and A.A.S. degree requirements. Most offerings are transferable to area four-year colleges (specific questions on transferability should be directed to counselors).

All course offerings are subject to change. The college cannot guarantee class offerings, designated times or specific instructors - as funding levels and student interest may affect whether or not an offering is available.

Click on the course title to view course description.

Course Title Credits
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.

At SCC we offer day and night geology classes that satisfy A.A. degree requirements. We also offer 200-level courses that may be used as liberal arts electives. All of the geology classes offered at SCC are transferable to area four-year colleges (specific questions on transferability should be directed to counselors).

The geology lab is located in Room 303 of SCC's new Science Building (Building 27).

The Science Department also sponsors an annual Geology Lecture Series.

Resources

(from Andy Buddington's site)

SCC students at Golden Horn Batholith, WA
All course offerings are subject to change. The college cannot guarantee class offerings, designated times or specific instructors - as funding levels and student interest may affect whether or not an offering is available.

Click on the course title to view course description.

Course Title Credits

Geology Pre-Major

Consult the official program outline
for more information about this program.
link to outline

Earth Science Pre-Major

Consult the official program outline
for more information about this program.
link to outline

Earth Science Degrees and Careers

Earth Sciences Pre-Major
Geology Pre-Major

Program Description

The Science Department at SCC offers courses in the fields of physical geology, historical geology, environmental geology, and Pacific Northwest geology. These courses would enable students to pursue interests in the earth sciences either as a major area of study, part of the liberal arts curriculum, or to satisfy a broadened interest of study.

Documents

» Suggested Class Schedules (PDF) - This information is subject to change without notice.

Earth Science Careers

Employment opportunities in the earth sciences are considerably varied. A four-year or graduate-level degree in the earth sciences can lead to careers as science educators at the K/12 and collegiate levels as well as researchers in a variety of subdisciplines such as volcanology, marine geology, paleontology, seismology, tectonics, mineralogy, hydrology, soils, engineering geology, and geologic hazards. Earth science careers within industry include natural resource exploration and development (minerals and energy), and numerous options in the field of environmental assessment and remediation. Public agency positions for earth scientists range from local, city and county to the state and federal levels.

For more information on earth science careers, go to:

Because of the nature of their work, earth scientists are often required to travel to unique and diverse locations worldwide; relocation for job prospects, depending on the branch of earth science pursued, should be considered. Future employment trends in the earth sciences will focus on an increasing awareness to environmental systems including water, soil, and biological resources. The understanding of pollutants and contamination of earth systems will continue to be a challenge for future generations.

Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.

SCC's new geology laboratory is located in Room 303 of the state-of-the-art Science Building (Building 27) on the SCC campus. The lab has numerous displays of mineral, rock, and fossil specimens.

photo
photo
photo

Geology Lecture Series

Each year the SCC Science Department presents the Geology Lecture Series, four evening presentations addressing general topics in the earth sciences. The Geology Lecture Series brings in noted scientists from around the United States and Canada, to speak on subjects of popular appeal. Each presentation is free and the public is welcome. Videos of previous GLS presentations are available in the SCC Instructional Media Lab (533-8085), located within the SCC Learning Resources Center, Building 16.


Spring 2012

  • May 4, 2012, 7:00-9:00 PM
    Missoula Floods, Glaciers, and Early People and Explorers in Northeast Washington
    Dr. Gene Kiver (Eastern Washington University), Jack Nesbit
    An Ice Age Floods Institute presentation
    This lecture is free and open to the public.
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

  • Saturday, May 5, 2012, 7:30 a.m.-6:00 PM
    Field Trip: Spokane to the Pend Oreille Valley
    Dr. Gene Kiver (Eastern Washington University), Jack Nesbit
    An Ice Age Floods Institute presentation
    This is an all-day field excursion by deluxe bus to the Pend Oreille Valley and Kalispell Indian Reservation. It will be led by Gene Kiver, Jack Nisbet, and Bruce Bjornstad. For additional information, email lindakl@centurytel.net or call 509-235-4251.


Winter 2012

  • January 30, 2012, 7 PM
    Cataclysms on the Columbia: The Great Missoula Floods
    Dr. Scott Burns, Portland State University
    Scott Burns is a Professor of Geology at Portland State University and coauthor (with John Allen and Marjorie Burns) of the acclaimed book, Cataclysms on the Columbia: The Great Missoula Floods. He will be presenting on the topic from the most recent edition. This story never gets old and if you have ever heard Scott speak, you know this presentation will be an exciting ride!
    This lecture is free and open to the public.
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College


2010-2011 Schedule

  • October 11, 2010, 7 PM
    Some Springs and Fossil Discoveries in Washington Territory
    Charles T. Luttrell, Washington State Parks Archaeologist
    The Ice Age Floods Institute, Cheney-Spokane Chapter, sponsored this public lecture by Charles T. Luttrell, Washington State Parks Archaeologist. Luttrell spoke about numerous fossils that were recovered during the late 1870s from natural springs located within the northern Palouse Hills - an area mostly bypassed by the many Glacial Lake Missoula outburst floods. Columbia mammoths are the best known specimens, but other species include bison, antelope, and deer. Some spring locales also contained prehistoric artifacts. The Palouse Hills sub-region is a unique environment whose potential to contain extinct fauna and other discoveries is largely unrealized.
    » Download poster (PDF)
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

  • January 19, 2011, 7 PM
    My Mineralogical and Geological Lessons Learned from a Decade of Asbestos Issues in Libby, Montana
    Dr. Mickey Gunter, University of Idaho
    Dr. Mickey Gunter spent a decade researching the geology and asbestos mineralogy of the Libby vermiculite deposit in Libby, Montana. During that time, Gunter was involved with the ongoing litigation associated with health issues experienced by miners (and their families) exposed to asbestos minerals at the now-closed mine. This presentation focused on research efforts by Dr. Gunter and his students to recognize and "fingerprint" the Libby vermiculite (and asbestos) and to provide sound mineralogical and geological information to ongoing asbestos issues in the Libby area.
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

  • February 28, 2011, 7 PM
    Photography Crystallized
    Jeffrey Scovil, Photographer
    Internationally renowned mineral photographer Jeffrey Scovil presented a spectacular visual slideshow on wonders of the mineral kingdom; photo images guaranteed to reveal the beauty and complexities of minerals. This vivid and close-up presentation examined unique and beautiful crystal specimens from all over the world.
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

  • May 23, 2011, 7 PM
    The State of Coral Reefs Worldwide
    Dr. Chris Langdon
    Chris Langdon is an Associate Professor of marine biology and fisheries at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. His primary research looks at the biology of corals and coral reef complexes and how reefs respond to global changes to tropical marine ecosystems. In this presentation, Dr. Langdon will do an overview of reef systems worldwide and how reefs are responding to various changes presently occurring in the world's oceans.
    Dr. Chris Langdon
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

2009-2010 Schedule

  • October 15, 2009, 7 PM
    Ice-Age Impacts on Tundra Plant Diversity
    Dr. Eric DeChaine, Biology Department, Western Washington University
    Travel across various mountainous and arctic regions on an adventure researching the beautiful world of tundra flowers and plants. Dr. DeChaine's research investigates the role of ice-age climate cycles on the development of tundra plant evolution and diversity along with what changes are presently being observed as a result of today's warming global conditions. In this presentation, see beautiful landscapes and scenery and even more spectacular plant life that developed in some of the world's harshest climate regions.

  • February 16, 2010, 7 PM
    Historic and Cataclysmic Eruptions of Kilauea Volcano
    Dr. Don Swanson, United States Geologic Survey, Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

  • May 4, 2010, 7 PM
    Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem!
    Dr. Richard Feely (www.pmel.noaa.gov/co2/personnel/feely.html)
    NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
    Location: SCC Lair Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College

GLS Sponsors

These popular community events would not be possible without the generous support of regional businesses and the SCC Student Activities Council. The current sponsors include:

Spokane Community College Student Activities Council

Teck American Incorporated


Lectures From Previous Years

  • January 28, 2009, 7 PM
    The Arctic on the Fast Track of Change - Dr. Julienne Stroeve - National Snow and Ice Data Center
    The planet is presently experiencing the "collapse" of a major geo/ecosystem. Loss of the Arctic (seasonal) summer ice cover will have profound and negative effects to Arctic ecosystems (ocean and land) as well as to subsistence populations. Observations and measurements (2007 record low year) are causing scientists to rethink the rates of Arctic ice loss due to global warming; rates of warming, glacial and permafrost degradation are accelerating faster than believed just five years prior. This talk presents the most recent research in the Arctic and observations being made by glaciologists and atmospheric scientists working in the Arctic regions.
  • » View streaming video of this lecture
    (video link)
  • October 10, 2007, 7 PM
    Alaska Walkabout - Marty Zajanc, Traveler-explorer
    Marty Zajanc began with nothing in Alaska but the desire to follow beauty, detour for adventure, and search for the hidden path of knowledge. Ten years later, after nine different treks and seven months of travel, he walked into Barrow, completing a 3,000 mile serpentine journey across one of the last great wilderness areas on the planet. He was smiling....
    Location: SCC Lair Student Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College
  • » View streaming video of this lecture
    (video link)
  • April 24, 2008, 7 PM
    Louisiana's Hurricane Blues - Dr. Ivor van Heerden, Louisiana State University Hurricane Center
    Location: SCC Lair Student Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College
  • » View streaming video of this lecture
    (video link)
  • May 27, 2008, 7 PM
    Terroir in the Pacific Northwest: Relation of Geology, Soils, and Climate to Great Wines - Dr. Scott Burns, Portland State University
    Location: SCC Lair Student Auditorium, Building 6, Spokane Community College
  • » View streaming video of this lecture
    (video link)

Lab Photos

The science of physics seeks to understand the physical universe and deals with the behavior of matter and energy at the most fundamental level. By observation, physicists search for the basic principles that explain natural phenomena. The concepts of physics overlap many disciplines. Knowledge of physics provides a strong background for careers in science, engineering, computer technology, or education.

Hubble photo - Chaos at the Heart of Orion
"Chaos at the Heart of Orion"
(Hubble/NASA)
Lab Photos
All course offerings are subject to change. The college cannot guarantee class offerings, designated times or specific instructors - as funding levels and student interest may affect whether or not an offering is available.

Click on the course title to view course description.

Course Title Credits

There are several reasons, apart from the obvious reason for a career, that one should take physics.

Physics is the most fundamental of the sciences.

Physics is concerned with the most basic building blocks of all things; from quarks to the solar system. The study of physics means trying to find out what the universe is made of, and how these things move and interact with each other. So in one sense, all the other sciences are built on the knowledge gained through the study of physics. Physics is the foundation of all sciences.

Physics is beautiful.

Physicists love simplicity. They are constantly striving to find the most fundamental ideas that can be used to describe even the most complex of phenomena. For example, how do we propel a rocket such that it no longer feels the earth's gravity? Or, how does a train stretched three miles long keep itself on the tracks without slipping? Newton found that only a very small number of concepts could be used to describe just about the entire mechanical world; from steam engines to the motion of the planets. Not only is this beautiful, it's downright amazing!

Physics teaches you to think.

This might seem like a strange statement. The technique of physics includes intellectual approaches to problem solving with methods universal to all science. Physics training develops the skills necessary for the proper analysis and handling of observations and data that is needed in all the other sciences.

Physics is a creative subject.

The concepts of physics do not come easily. Someone has to come up with a theory to begin with. This is just as much a creative process as composing music. But where physics, and science in general, differ from the Arts is that no one will accept your theory unless you have some way of testing its validity. For example, how do you tell that there is a planet orbiting a star that is so far away that it appears as nothing more than a spec of light in even the most powerful telescopes?

Physics discovers and explains mysteries.

How do you convince someone that there exists a region in the universe called a "black hole," which swallows virtually everything that comes close to it? Not even quantum of light will ever come back once swallowed?

Physics gives you a new appreciation of the world around you.

You can look at a rainbow and say "wow, pretty colors!", or you can marvel at the amazing interactions between photons and electrons that come together in that particular way when light from the sun strikes spherical water droplets in the sky, and that you perceive as a multicolored arc suspended in the air. Now that's awe!

Physics is fulfilling.

Lastly, studying physics gives you the opportunity of playing with a lot of really fun stuff. The lab equipment and experiments are fun. It is the human desire to be unique above all creatures and physics offers this desire in ways based on research and technological developments.

Physics students may select a career in a wide range of scientific and technical fields. Students should bear in mind that most of these career areas require education or training beyond the Associate of Science degree. Depending on the career plans of the student, the Physics emphasis will be at the general physics or the college physics level.

The Associate of Science degree with an emphasis in Physics prepares the student to pursue university studies leading to a bachelor's degree. The basic AS program, at the general physics level, prepares students for further education in fields such as biology, medicine, or secondary education. Students seeking a bachelor's degree in fields such as physics, engineering, or computer science will require the more advanced mathematics and physics.
Students planning to transfer to a college or university should check the specific degree plan requirements of their intended major.

Career fields available to the physics student include:

  • Aerospace Technology
  • Astronomy
  • Biophysics
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Elementary or Secondary Education
  • Engineering Civil, Electrical, Industrial or mechanical
  • Geophysics
  • Hydrogeology
  • Medicine
  • Radiology
  • Pharmacy
  • Research Scientist
  • Meteorology
  • Patent Law
  • Physics

General Physics Level

Students seeking degrees in biology or pre-medicine should select general physics courses.

University Physics Level

Students seeking advanced degrees in science and engineering fields should select the general physics level courses and advanced level physics and mathematics courses (such as the courses listed below) for the AS degree.

  • University Physics I
  • University Physics II
  • Calculus I
  • Calculus II

Recommended Electives

  • Stars and Galaxies
  • Academic Co-op Physics
  • General Chemistry I
  • General Chemistry II
  • Technical and Business Writing (ENGLISH)
  • Pre-Calculus
  • Linear Algebra
  • Differential Equations
  • Calculus III
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Browse additional programs in the CCS Online Catalog.
Print Page